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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
shoppers into panic. >> an animal rescue group trying to help an orphanned bob cat with an unusual problem. >> taking a look outside, boy, it looks like holidays are over. look at the commute going into the east bay. this is a mess, a little bit better for the peninsula you know? you've got to be patient out there. ÑsÑs >>> we want to show you incredible video out of china showing a 33 ton shark tank exploding in shanghai. just a huge wave of water just stops on the onlookers. 15 people were injured. none critically. three lemon sharks and dozens of smaller fish died. shanghai officials say cold temperatures and shod yes materials made the glass so brittle. >> trouble here, some scary moments for shoppers in a sacramento mall after reports of gunfire last night. people ran for safety. to started about 5:00 in the afternoon ai. group of 20 teens pushed shoppers and knocked over things creating a lot of noise, sounding like gunfire, sending people scrambling for cover. stores locked down, shoppers afraid of another mass shooting. happen. hid hinld the counter at macy's. and then, i was lik
control took center stage during the half time show of a football game last night. and listen to what bob costas said in response it a murder-suicide over a kansas city player. >> handguns do not enhance our safety. exacerbate our flaws and tempt us into arguments and embracing confrontation rather than avoiding it. and here is what i believe if jovan belcher didn't possess a gun, he and cassandra perkins would both be alive today. stuart: we want to know what you think. go to our facebook page, weigh in, we value your opinion. and a top environmentalist, will a carbon tax will cause the glaciers from melting and temperatures from rising. his response in one second. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. to relentlessly protectelock what matters most... [beeping.
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase yo
in state today in the capitol rotunda. this , a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto®
is bob dean from the national resources defense council. one of the groups behind that particular study. bob, thank you. welcome to the show. >> thank you, sandra. good to be here. sandra: so let me get this straight. you're blaming the warm winters, lack of snow on climate change? >> absolutely. you mentioned sandra, we're on track as of end of the november we had the hottest year on record in this country. 3.3 degrees hotter than the 20th century average. it hurt our farmers and ranchers, devastated worst drought in 50 years. fires detroit nine million acres of forest and fields. we'll seeing it on the ski slopes. climate change for the slopes means less snow on the ground, feuder skiers on the slopes. if you make your living in the business, less money in the wallet and paycheck. sandra: one might question that reasoning behind this and say a billion dollar loss for the industry over the past decade. your study says 27,000 jobs have been lost. i might remind you hey, we've been in a brutal recession. we're slow coming out of it. it might be the weak economy driving a lot of tourists
telling us that this is not a balanced plan. they don't like it yet. and then earlier today, senator bob corker was on cnbc kind of pooh-poohing the whole thing. take a listen. >> we're not close to a deal. and i've been trying for three weeks, i've been standing on my head doing cartwheels to try to pivot toward entitlement reform. this is not a deal here. >> so carl, what's going on right now on capitol hill is that speaker boehner is meeting with his republican conference colleagues behind closed doors. we expect that at the top of the next hour, he's going to come out and talk before cameras. we'll get some reaction from his colleagues as well, what they think of this proposal and where they think this negotiation needs to go. but clearly, negotiations are ongoing, and the president and the speaker are coming closer together, whether or not that makes everybody happy or enough people happy to get a deal still remains to be seen, carl. >> eamon, this is a tough one to read. had the biggest movement been in that -- in the line in the sand with regards to how much people need to make to
to serve. bob, these projections... they're... optimistic. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >> once again, our developing story tonight, no deal still on the fiscal cliff. president obama handing the matter over to the senate leaders and without any resolution, many people are scrambling to shore up their finances. hampton pearson has the fiscal cliff frenzy. hampton. >>? >> you got it, michelle. we're operating in an environment where, quote, uncertainty is the new normal. this is the equivalent of the last-minute christmas shopping to protect assets of going over the fiscal cliff, planners and wealth managers say it's been a banner year especially for estate planning and here's a couple of reason yes. there's a big change coming with the gift tax. right now there's a $5 million exempted and the tax rate is 35%. on midnight on new year's eve
will never lift a finger for you again." >> those are tough words! >> you know the old bob novak, he used to say that republicans were put on earth to cut taxes. and if they don't, they have no purpose. >> no purpose, yeah. >> that was bob novak. you know, all of a sudden we're faced with a set of circumstances where we're talking about cutting taxes on spending, and now we've got stuff on the table to react to, and conservatives don't feel comfortable with what's on the table. >> so what is it that conservatives would like to have happen? in other words, compromise. you need compromise to get a deal done, but you're sort of saying don't compromise. >> no, we're saying have a serious conversation. the president is proposing taking an aspirin when we've got a bad case of pneumonia. you've got a trillion-dollar deficit this year, $172 billion just in november. 60% of our budget more or less is on entitlements. and he's proposing not to touch entitlements? that's a nonstarter. i mean, that is an irresponsible position to take. you've got cost of living -- >> that's not his position. it's not
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social security. among those ideas are raising the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entit
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. now is the perfect time to visit anyone of our states. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride, go fishing or just lay in the sun. we've got coastline to explore and wildlife to photograph. and there's world class dining with
. it's a large mass of garbage created by revelers which usually end up bobbing in the water throughout this long night. officials say almost a million krathongs are left behind after the festival each year in bangkok alone. >> translator: thais use the rivers to carry away all the bad things. as a result, there's always a large amount of garbage left over. >> reporter: to help to solve problem, state agencies are asking people to share a krathong with family or friends or make them out of natural materials. another increasingly popular option is the use of biodegradable materials such as bread. >> translator: many people are choosing bread krathongs nowadays. they are environmentally friendly, and the fish love them. >> reporter: the more technologically sophisticated can celebrate the festival online. visitors to this website can choose their favorite krathong, then add their name and wish. they can launch their krathong on this virtual river. >> any kind of real krathong will always affect the environment. the online version is cleaner and leaves nothing behind. >> reporter: but thes
, bob costas uses a horrifying murder-suicide involving a nfl player to call for stricter gun control. appropriate use of his platform? our news watch panel weighs in. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine or yellowing of skin or eyes. these could be signs of rare but serious sideeffects. ♪ is your cholesterol at goal? alk to your doctor aut crestor. [ female anno
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase yo
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everyone, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, mark mckinnon, and richard haass. >> let's start -- there's so much to talk about but, richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally, and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majorityism. people like morsi win elections but winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern. the question is whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he di
, he was horrible in debates. >> no, you had to hold your breath all the time. >> and then bob dole, you had to hold your breath. and george w., good old guy, but that guy had trouble with the english language. >> you're going up against bubba. the best on the planet. >> it would be nice to have somebody -- >> no, that's why it was so sad when people like mitch daniels and haley didn't go in this time because they sound like churchill compared. >> guess who i just got an e-mail from? alexandra liebenthal. how exciting. julia, stay with us. >> jean just e-mailed me. >> you're a bad man. i mean, you really are. >> bad to the bone. >> we should do a segment. >> yeah. >> like the conversation we had at the dinner table. and you all have to listen. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. you wrote this past month. did you make your deadline? >> you know, again -- >> david. >> we love david. >> we love david. >> the magazine's awesome. it came with an ax. >> oh. >> i bought it for my mom for christmas. >> that was sweet. >> she'll use it. >> chop up. >> you have no idea. >> actionabl
there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, w
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
we're willing to go book to 39.6%, as bob corker said over the weekend? is it helpful? >> i think it is hopeful for the republicans on the revenue side we're willing to move. i believe in capping deductions. bowles-simpson is bipartisan proposal. "gang of six" senators, three democrats, three republicans. they didn't raise rates. they capped deductions to. raising rates is partisan political trophy for obama. i don't want to go down that road only if they do entitlement reform. i don't hear any democrat of note hering what i would do on the entitlement side. if i were republicans i would be quiet for a while and see what the democrats put on the table for entitlement reform. >> big debate last week republicans saying we will do exactly with you said. we're only going to do cuts in deductions. we'll eliminate loop hoses. -- loopholes. that is what happened over the weekend. seems like over the weekend it dissolved into accepting of raising tax rates. the president said there is no deal unless i get that. that is what i ran on. american people are expecting that. >> here is where th
member the president said in a debate, the debate, he said that i didn't come up with this. then bob woodward came out and said, yes, you did. you know, both a top aide said that you guys came up with this idea of the white house. look in the mirror, right. >> that's exactly right. a lot of people on wall street and in the media are saying just don't do it, don't go over the cliff. you know, and then that shows a we that we still have a 16 trillion-dollar national debt. so when the world are we going to get serious about what the american people say they want, which is reduction in the debt so that we don't become a country that looks like greece. [talking over each other] gregg: capitol hill and pennsylvania avenue, maybe they just think 16 trillion, 25 trillion, who cares. maybe they don't think it has a depressive effect on economic growth, and soaking up the credit markets, which women's businesses. >> that's exactly right. we don't have to wonder what this will go by. all we have to do is look over the pond and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain an
we are. okay? it's the end of the week. we're going in to new year's and what do we have? bob corker got up today, senator, republican, senior guy now on this issue. and what does he say? we may not get a deal and we're going to threaten the good faith and credit of the united states again. okay? 514 days and what do we get? more debt ceiling threats and the irony is you talk about the pressure but the irony is republican base on wall street thinks that's a terrible idea. so what does the president have to do? something that's uncomfortable for him because he's more responsible than these guys and say i care so much about a deal to negotiate with myself. i'm going to give it up and still threatening me and i think he has to take an maxim from donald rumsfeld, weakness is provocative. tell them we're strong, the white house, we were re-elected. you go home. you go home and deal with it because this is out of control and nobody's angry enough to realize it. >> you're angry enough. >> i'm alone. >> no, you're not. >> michael shear's not angry. he's measured and i understand that and we'
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
. senator bob corker is asking for specifics regarding the trillion in cuts that the president referred to on meet the press. and covering that from benghazi and on and on. >> and in your brew with david gregory you offered over one trillion and agreement with congress and avert the fiscal cliff. you are silent on the specifics. wrestling with the national's crisis help us to have a concrete plan and legislative language with you. >> it was interesting, very wide raging . there were not opportunities and he didn't get specifics when he talked about all of the things he's offered. at one point i offered so many changes and entitlements? i askscatched my head and wondered what changes and entitlements. he said the democrats arangry at me. i said what are the specifics. that was a interesting level. >> dave: he put in the corner and said only thing they care about is creating tax cuts for the wettley. demonize the opponent while you sate sit down. that works out it infuriate your opponent. the president's main goal is to raise taxings. put out legislation and put out a bill and vote on it
that wasn't a fun time. >> not like in a room having a cocktail. >> dave: how about republican bob corker who talked to greta about the spending cuts that they would like to see from the democrats thus far not on the table. it's a shame in this nation where every developed country in the world knows our fiscal cliff is our fiscal solvency you have to have these leverage points. sit down and solve the problem because we know it's our greatest threat. that's not the case here. we have a president who has not laid out a plan. is he on yulingsly a spendaholic. >> dave: here is the problem for republicans though. if there is no deal out of the senate he will say okay i need an up or down vote on the $250,000 up or down mark. if republicans want to go on record to say no on that. that's going to be very politically dangerous for john boehner in the house. that's the bottom line. >> juliet: i know you are getting a lot of tweets. mine is like i blame, this i blame that guy. it's interesting to hear what you guys have to say about that first, let's go to peter doocy. what happens this weekend as
tuned. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? >>> let's get final thoughts from our guest host. greg fle
of defense. bill gates, a very good secretary of defense, -- bob gates said to me you need quickly to cultivate and devote time to relationships because you realize you're in this together. >> completely agree. and i would say if anything the pendulum is coming back hardener that direction. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning coming out of the crisis. i think there's less trust in general. >> rose: it's part of the job in washington. so you value relationship very much and so there are hundreds of c.e.o.s that i know who i can pick up the phone and they trust g.e. and they trust g.e. because they know me or my team and i think that's immensely valuable and i think in the end it's important that business leaders and politicians have a better sense of trust than maybe what we've had over the last five years and, again, those things never work unless you assume you're 50% of the problem. that's what you've got to -- >> rose: assume you're 50% of the problem? in other words -- >> i'm not blameless. >> there's two kinds of advice you can give. this is what i try to do. one is here's what
richman; and republican senator bob corker. gwen ifill has our next installment. >> ifill: a senior democrat on the house banking committee and the vice chair of the centrist new democrat coalition. welcome, congresswoman. we heard earlier today from john boehner and from jay carney at the white house, one saying spending cuts aren't serious coming from the house and the other saying the white house has put forth all the spending cuts that need to be put out. how do you prioritize what should be the focus here: spending cuts or raising revenue? >> most of us know it's got to be both. the fact is the president put out a really very sensible plan, middle-ground where it actually included spending cuts. we've already done a trillion dollars and we'll be doing another trillion dollars over a trillion dollars in cuts. that's $2 trillion. that's serious spending cuts over and above what we've done already. and of course we do think there has to be some revenue. then we're going to make sure we're doing the right kind of investments so we see economic growth. if it's not all three we're no
him to in michigan, senator inouye made his two lifelong friends, one senator bob dole, who as we know, became majority leader here in the senate and the republican nominee for president of the united states. and his other lifetime friend is the late senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate and the hart building, the massive senate office building, is named after him. asked by his son why after being classified as an enemy alien he and the members of the 442nd fought so heroically, senator inouye said in his usual, calm man, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. he was a recipient of the medal of honor, a congressional gold medal, the highest honor can bestow. he served the distinguished service cross, a bronze star for valor and, of course, a purple heart. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress he displayed on if battlefield. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting that i had, i mentioned it very previously last night but it was ten days ago. i knew se
ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. >>> it was a crime that made headlines across the country in 199, it was all the rage in new york city, the 28-year-old white wall street investment banker jogging through central park when she was brutally assaulted, rained, left for dead. she was in a coma. five black and latino teenagers were arrested and convicted, they became known as the central park five. they spent between 6 and 13 years in prison, until a
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